Kids land bass in Tourney bites in Guanacaste

first_imgNo related posts. On July 15, More than 100 children put down their PlayStations, unplugged the computer, picked up some fishing gear and headed for Sabana Park for the Annual National Fishing Club kid’s Tournament. The club has been sponsoring this tournament for more than a decade, and according to club President Otto Dyes, the event is designed to promote sport fishing as a family activity.  Over the years, the club has been stocking the lake in the park with tilapia, largemouth bass, and some rainbow bass. Walking around the edge of the lake, I saw lots of small largemouth bass being landed, so my guess is there is a healthy population of larger fish. The top angler caught 16 in the four-hour tournament. Everyone fished from the shore, and the club has been active more than 50 years in promoting land-based fishing. From what I saw walking around the park that morning, everyone was a winner.Fishing reportNot a whole lot to toot the horn about this week, as fishing was slow in most parts of the country except Guanacaste. When the wind is not blowing, lots of marlin, sails and a few nice dorado are hitting along with the occasional tuna. Inside, wahoo, snapper and amberjack are still biting.Los Sueños has been really quiet, and further south down in Quepos, they are only managing to scrap up a couple of billfish per outing. A few tuna up to 50 pounds have hit the sushi bar, and the inshore reefs are saving the day with a good amberjack bite.Down south is seeing pretty much the same. Slow billfish action and a good inshore bite with roosterfish grabbing most of the attention. There was a good tuna bite until a purse seiner took the last one, after working the school of spinner dolphins many days in a row. We’ll talk about that next week.The Caribbean is lacking anglers, and the fish have only been active at the river mouth. A tarpon here and there and a few snook. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Economy and Business Class fares are being offered

first_imgEconomy and Business Class fares are being offered at special rates for a limited time as Emirates and Qantas celebrate the fifth anniversary of their partnership.The airlines have created a range of competitive fares to a host of destinations across UK and Europe, on bookings made before 30 April 2018, for select travel dates.Economy Class return fares start from $1,299 to London, $1,329 to Dublin, $1,439 to Amsterdam and Paris, and $1,479 to Vienna, while return business fares start at $7,199 to London, $7,139 to Dublin, $7,249 to Amsterdam, $7,269 to Paris and $7,589 to Vienna.*T & Cs apply airlinesearlybirdsEmiratesEuropeqantasUKlast_img read more

Read More →

American company Terrafugia says its new carplane

first_imgAmerican company Terrafugia says its new car/plane combination called the ‘Transition’ could transform the world of personal flight.The two-seater mini-plane can be stored in your garage (the wings fold up), driven to your local airstrip, and then flown to your destination. After you land, you just hit the road and continue your journey. RelatedIs it a car? Is it a plane? It’s both! TWO flying cars ready for launch.Are flying cars the transport of the future?7 of the weirdest travel stories of 2014Pigs on planes, windowless flights and other wacky travel stories from the last 12 months.Flying with children: 25 top tips for keeping kids happy on boardIt’s summer, and time for the big annual summer holiday! If you’re flying with kids you might be worried about arriving in one piece. What if they act up, or spend the whole flight screaming? What if you land more frazzled than ready for fun? We could say “stuff ’em”… Though dubbed a ‘flying car’, the Transition is really a plane that can be driven on roads, rather than a car with wings. But rather than running on expensive aviation fuel, you can fill it up on regular unleaded petrol. It even has a giant parachute that can be deployed in the event of a malfunction, which saves the entire plane!But the cost of being George Jetson won’t come cheap; a Transition aircraft will set you back around $250,000. However, despite the high price tag, already 100 deposits have been put down with the first delivery expected next year.You can learn to fly a Transition in as little as 20 hours but a world where you can jump in your flying car and jet off to Spain is still a while away. In fact, flying light aircraft over urban areas is generally restricted so don’t expect to be doing a Chitty Chitty Bang Bang anytime soon. However, you’ve got to admit, the Transition is an extremely exciting evolution in the world of flight.tp://www.youtube.com/embed/iE2Ij7Rfw1QPictures and video by TerrafugiaReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Mapcenter_img Zipping around the skies in your own personal plane has long been a vision of the future, but after a century of appearing only in sci-fi films, the flying car is now a reality.last_img read more

Read More →

Macomb County lawmakers laud bill addressing local pollution

first_img13Dec Macomb County lawmakers laud bill addressing local pollution The five Republican legislators representing Macomb County residents today applauded House passage of a budget bill to address the emerging threat posed by a type of chemical contaminant identified in the Clinton River and Lake St. Clair.State Reps. Diana Farrington, Pamela Hornberger, Peter Lucido, Steve Marino and Jeff Yaroch all voted for the supplemental budget bill to provide testing, monitoring and technical assistance at more than a dozen sites across Michigan where per- and polyfouorakyl substances (PFAS) have been found in groundwater.“I think this funding is essential to ensure the health, safety and welfare of our Macomb County communities,” said Marino, of Harrison Township, whose district includes the lake, river and Selfridge Air Base. “Although Selfridge is not one of the sites identified as polluted, I am certain it will be added to the list because of the fire-suppression chemicals that have been used there for years. We need to proactively mitigate this pollution and protect families in our communities.”The bill also funds improvements to the state’s water-testing laboratory, which does not have the capacity to test for PFAS.“Water testing is done out of state and it can take up to eight weeks for families across the state to get results,” said Farrington, of Utica. “That’s simply unacceptable. Our families deserve to have results in a more immediate manner.”Hornberger, of Chesterfield Township, said she is pleased the bill requires the party causing the pollution to pay for clean-up.“The legislation requires any private or public entity responsible for PFAS contamination, including the federal Department of Defense, to reimburse the state,” Hornberger said.Lucido, of Shelby Township, said he believes the locations identified as being polluted as only the tip of the iceberg.“PFAS are found not only in fire suppressants, but have been used in hundreds of industrial applications and consumer products such as carpeting, apparels, upholstery, food paper wrappings, and metal plating,” Lucido said. “Unfortunately, I think the contamination is more widespread than we first believed.”Yaroch, of Richmond, said it is vital not only to protect the health of families throughout the state, but also to preserve our natural resources.“Addressing contaminants and protecting our lakes and rivers is a top priority,” Yaroch said.The bill now goes to the governor for consideration.#####The supplemental bill is House Bill 4320. Categories: Marino News,Newscenter_img Budget measure key step in dealing with health threatlast_img read more

Read More →

How Much Religious Teaching Should Be in Charter Schools

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 SharesJuly 14, 2014; The RepublicIf you were to pick American theologians whose work should be included in a charter school’s curriculum, whom would you choose? In our corner, we might pick Reinhold Neibuhr and his brother H. Richard Neibuhr, maybe Walter Rauschenbush for his defining role in the Social Gospel movement, and of course Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. All had significant roles in interpreting the role of religion in the development of America.There are many other theologians whose books might warrant inclusion, but the Heritage Academy charter school in Mesa, Arizona is partial to the writings of Cleon Skousen, a conservative Mormon theologian and former FBI agent who declared that the founding of the United States was a divine miracle. Twelfth-grade students at Heritage have to read two Skousen tomes totaling at least 1,200 pages.Don’t know Skousen? If you were a Tea Party–type, you might; he is largely read in those circles. Christina Botteri, a spokeswoman for the California-based National Tea Party Federation, was quoted in this article by Cathryn Creno in The Republic to say that one of Skousen’s books is considered “a handbook of tea-party ideals” and specifically inspired her to join the Tea Party movement. TV and radio personality Glenn Beck, who rediscovered religion in the late 1990s when he became a Mormon, is a fan of Skousen and wrote in the foreword for Skousen’s The 5,000-Year Leap that the book was “divinely inspired.”Americans United for Separation of Church and State believes that Heritage’s inclusion of Skousen as required reading for its seniors constitutes illegally teaching religion. Heritage responds that Skousen is on the required readings list for students “to show them that religion influenced what the Founders did,” according to Heritage founder and school principal Earl Taylor. Alex Luchenitser, associate legal director for Americans United, counters that Skousen’s books “push ‘Christian nation’ propaganda and other religious teachings on impressionable young students.”Public schools cannot teach religion, but religious books, even the Bible, can be used as part of an academic curriculum. In Heritage’s view, Skousen’s books are part of the charter school’s history curriculum, demonstrating the role of religious belief in the movement for American independence. Americans United hasn’t yet sued Heritage or Arizona, but renewed its standing complaint with the State Board for Charter Schools this year. The state board, for its part, declared that its role is to “focus on whether the school is upholding the mission it describes in its charter,” not to determine which books it should or shouldn’t use.Principal Taylor seems unlikely to back down on this one. A biographical sketch of Taylor on a website called “The Title of Liberty” notes that Taylor was privately tutored by Skousen himself and then became head of the National Center for Constitutional Studies, originally founded by Skousen as the “Freemen Institute.” The Title of Liberty mission statement hints at the likelihood that Skousen’s inclusion in the Heritage curriculum might be perceived as potentially religious: “We are united in remembering and promoting God, freedom, family, faith and peace by raising The Title of Liberty Standard in all of its forms throughout the land.” The father of 10 children himself, Taylor is listed as a presenter for the Latter-day Saint Home Educators.Both of Skousen’s books, published by Taylor’s National Center, add up to hefty reading for high school seniors: 337 pages for The 5,000-Year Leap and 888 pages for The Making of America, according to Amazon. Taylor emailed The Republic to say he was cutting back somewhat on the mandatory Skousen readings, not because of the Americans United complaint, but to lessen the workload on the hard-pressed students. That doesn’t cut it for Americans United, according to Luchenitser, because the books are still used as textbooks at Heritage and recommended, though apparently now no longer required, to be read in their entirety.—Rick CohenShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

Read More →

Ford Foundation Can Capitalism Be Made to Work Better for Society

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 Shares September 29, 2014;Ford Forum (Ford Foundation)In the Ford Forum, the inaugural issue of what appears to be intended as a regular publication “to inspire fresh thinking and constructive dialogue,” Ford Foundation CEO Darren Walker poses an interesting question to a number of experts: “Where Markets Lead, Will Justice Follow?” Referring to foundations as products of the capitalist economic system, Walker asks, “How do we support efforts to change a system in which our own grantmaking resources are cultivated? How can we inform a more inclusive capitalism in which free enterprise flourishes and yet—as our mission and values demand—a broader justice prevails?”Before we go on, we would like to invite you to respond to the question at the Ford Forum itself.Walker is trying to bridge a contradiction in the structure of American philanthropy. Foundations are creatures of the “bounties of the markets” but are challenged “to help individuals and communities become more resilient in the face of market-driven inequality and the social instability and economic insecurity” that are the products of the economic system—along with private foundations like the Ford Foundation. Yale’s Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert Shiller, whose brilliant book, The Subprime Solution, provided a compelling analysis of the global financial crisis of the last decade, responds to Walker’s question with an argument for the importance of government in making the economic system more inclusive. For example, he proposes “government subsidies to offer financial advice for low-income people,” much like the notion of legal services for the poor. As he notes, “You have rich people with their lawyers and poor people who just don’t have a clue.” Shiller’s experience in monitoring the collapse of the mortgage system is a case study of the imbalance between the rich and the poor—and government’s weak efforts to help homeowners who faced foreclosures and frequently lost their homes.Raymond Offenheiser, the president of Oxfam America, looks at the roles of nonprofits like Oxfam and other advocacy organizations in holding multinational corporations “accountable to social and environmental standards.” It means having NGOs work and find common ground with corporations. Offenheiser notes that “92 percent [of investment in developing countries] is foreign direct investment from private capital,” meaning that it is going to be Unilever or Starbucks rather than USAID or the World Bank that will be a partner for international NGOs. The challenge, he says, is “that we needed to be thinking about poverty not as the absence of public goods—which leads to a gap-filling path—but rather as social exclusion, which meant that we should be looking at the barriers that limit people’s access to those things they need, such as education, health, credit, jobs and housing, and that could be addressed through policy, practice changes and, perhaps, better institutional performance by either the state or the market.”The formula, Offenheiser concludes, has three components: “an effective state; active citizens holding that state accountable; and inclusive markets, with citizens also holding those markets accountable to some degree.” Oxfam America views itself as crafting strategies for holding corporations accountable, citing as one example its “Behind the Brands” scorecard, which ranks the largest food and beverage corporations on seven issues: land investment policies, investments in water, carbon footprint and commitment to climate change issues, labor practices, investments in small farms, inclusion of women, and transparency of finances and other business practices. Ultimately, the improvement of the corporate role in society is to advance “from corporate responsibility to corporate accountability,” with Offenheiser noting that corporate social responsibility is “companies monitoring themselves,” resulting in some improvements in corporate behavior but falling short of what many countries needed: the incorporation of those voluntary standards into governmental regulatory systems that mandate corporate compliance.Offenheiser’s analysis stands somewhat in contrast with the observations of the Aspen Institute’s Judith Samuelson, who leans toward a stronger reliance on corporate self-regulation. “Global corporations command extraordinary resources and distribution systems, talent and problem-solving skills that we need to address complex problems,” Samuelson says, “Whether we like it or not, we don’t have global governance, but we do have global companies, and the behavior of multinationals is likely to shape the norms and help define what rights are respected.” Although she acknowledges that many global businesses have fallen short on human rights, particularly consumer brands like Apple and the Gap that have relied on overseas manufacturing and assembling, Samuelson says that companies have responded to NGO pressures (and the fear of social media) and shown that “they learn from their mistakes,” many transforming themselves to become “the better actors today.” She says such changes are simply “about smart business practices and attracting and maintaining customer loyalty.” Perhaps it is because of the swift and necessary kick some corporations have needed and deserved from NGO watchdogs, but Samuelson foresees a dynamic of NGOs asking, “How do we work alongside business?” and “Where is the business opportunity to be a first mover?” A former Ford Foundation staffer herself, Samuelson suggests that foundations should be funding nonprofits to work with business.Overall, the Ford Forum essays reviewed here express a core belief in the essential capitalist nature of the economic system, but with different definitions of reliance and trust on corporate self-regulation and self-improvement. MIT’s Otto Scharmer encapsulates the theme with a call for “tri-sector innovation” involving nonprofits working across sectoral lines. There is not a lot in these essays that suggests that the power of corporations is so pervasive and enormous that tri-sector partnerships might tilt strongly in favor of businesses and against NGOs and even government. Nonprofit watchdogs of corporate power have traditionally been underfunded by philanthropy. For the implicit agenda of the Ford Forum essays to meet Walker’s challenge of foundations “striv[ing] to ‘strengthen and improve’ the economic system in which it operates and flourishes,” foundations have to strengthen the system of nonprofit watchdogging of corporate power and corporate excesses, else corporations escape the scrutiny they need if they are going to be held accountable to higher environmental and social norms.—Rick CohenShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

Read More →

Croatian telco THrvatski Telekom has secured TV r

first_imgCroatian telco T-Hrvatski Telekom has secured TV rights to UEFA Champions League football for the 2012-2015 seasons for its MAXtv service.Viewers will be able to watch at least three Champions League matches a night, with the ability to view a total of 128 games per season. MAXtv will have the first choice to Tuesday night matches and second choice to Wednesday games. First pick games will be aired on the operator’s basic package, while other matches will be offered as part of its premium offering. Matches will also be available via the MAXtv multiscreen service.last_img read more

Read More →

Netflix has launched its Just For Kids portal on P

first_imgNetflix has launched its Just For Kids portal on PlayStation 3 consoles in the UK and Ireland.The curated section targets kids aged 12 years and younger. PS3 can search for titles by character, including Sonic, Johnny Test, Barney, Thomas the Tank Engine and Madeline. Titles are also arranged by genre, including superheroes, princesses, dinosaurs and girl power.Just For Kids is also available on PCs, Macs, Nintendo Wii and Apple TV devices. Netflix said it would launch the section on other devices including Xbox 360 and tablets later this year.last_img read more

Read More →

UK telco BT is updating its TV user interface with

first_imgUK telco BT is updating its TV user interface with a new look that it says will also make it easier and faster for viewers to find the programmes they want to watch.The redesigned interface will be rolled out to YouView box customers in July and to customers with a BT Vision+ box in the autumn.According to the telco, the update will improve the BT TV Player on YouView and the user interface on the previous BT Vision service.BT says it has responded to customer feedback and research to help shape the simpler new look. New features include more intuitive navigation, quicker links to recent activity on the homepage and a new colour palate, according to the company“Our update is more than just a makeover. It will improve the performance of BT TV for customers, making navigation easier and faster.  This follows our move from the BT Vision brand to simply using the BT master brand to cover our TV services,” said Alex Green, director of BT TV.last_img read more

Read More →

Russian service provider Akado has added two new s

first_imgRussian service provider Akado has added two new sports channels to its programming line-up.The operator has added NTV+s HD Sports channel to its Sport and HD Sport packages. The channel, which launched in 2007, includes major European football tournaments including the Champions League and Europa League live, as well as sports including ice-hockey,Akado has also added NTV+ Tennis to its line-up. The channel covers major ATP and WTA tennis championships, as well as ancillary programming.The channels will be available in Moscow and St Petersburg and the Leningrad region.last_img read more

Read More →

Combined worldwide shipments of PCs laptops tabl

first_imgCombined worldwide shipments of PCs, laptops, tablets and mobile phones are expected to climb 1.5% year-on-year in 2015 to reach 2.5 billion units, according to Gartner.The research firm predicts that end-user spending on devices will total US$606 billion in 2015, but said that this would mark for the first time since 2010 a 5.7% decline in current US dollars.“Our forecast for unit shipment growth for all devices in 2015 has dropped by 1.3 percentage points from last quarter’s estimate. This was partly due to a continued slowdown in PC purchases in Western Europe, Russia and Japan in particular, largely due to price increases resulting from local currency devaluation against the dollar,” said Gartner research director, Ranjit Atwal.last_img read more

Read More →

Swisscom had signed up 564000 customers to its TV

first_imgSwisscom had signed up 564,000 customers to its TV 2.0 service by the end of June, up 258,000 in the first half of the year.The company had a total of 1.238 million TV customers at the end of the second quarter, up 13.5% year-on-year, and up 73,000 in the first half of this year. Fixed fee subscriptions accounted for 1.09 million of these.The majority of TV 2.0 subscribers upgraded from a previous Swisscom offering. Swisscom said that the growth in TV and broadband connections more than offset the company’s decline in fixed line customers.Broadcast subscribers numbered 1.922 million, up 3.6%, while fixed-line customers fell by 4.7% to 2.697 million.Swisscom declined to include a provision in its second quarter financials in relation to the CHF143 million (€132 million) fine demanded by the country’s competition watchdog over its alleged abuse of its dominant market position by marketing sports content exclusively to its subscribers. The competition commission last month said that Swisscom and Teleclub occupied a dominant position in the supply of football and ice hockey and should make its offering available to all TV platforms at non-discriminatory terms.Swisscom said it acted legally and that it does not believe a court of final appeal will levy sanctions.Swisscom posted overall revenues of CHF5.758 billion for the first half, up 1% and EBITDA of CHF2.133 billion, down 2.2%.“Despite price cuts for roaming services, currency effects and strong competition, we enjoyed a solid and pleasing result in the first half of the year,” said CEO Urs Schaeppi.“On a like-for-like basis, we increased revenue and operating income (EBITDA). We are investing heavily in our network and new offerings, and have gained a large number of new customers, particularly with Swisscom TV and bundled contracts. [Swisscom’s Italian subsidiary] Fastweb has been performing very well in the Italian market and increased its customer base by more than 8%.”last_img read more

Read More →

Over a third of Latvian internet subscribers do no

first_imgOver a third of Latvian internet subscribers do not take a TV service, rising to an absolute majority among those under 30, according to a survey carried out by cable operator Baltcom.The Baltcom survey found that 60% of internet subscribers across the country took both TV and broadband, while 15% also took a fixed phone service.According to the survey, 70% of internet subscribers under the age of 30 took only the internet. Internet service sales far exceed TV service sales in the country.Baltcom chairman Nicholas Boissin said that consumer’s daily habits were changing along with growth in internet penetration, with more customers only wanting to pay for content they acstually consumed. He said that telecom operators should focus on offering an attractive service and said that Baltcom had focused on investing significantly in developing its internet network.The same survey found that 88% of the country’s internet users used the service to play games, with a majority playing computer games and about 7% using a game console.Baltcom surveyed 527 internet users across the country between September 29 and October 6.last_img read more

Read More →

The BBC has announced a raft of new drama series i

first_imgThe BBC has announced a raft of new drama series including Duty/Shame, a co–production with Netflix about a Japanese detective who travels to London looking for his missing brother.The series was one of eleven new dramas for BBC One and one apiece for BBC Two and internet service Three.BBC drama controller Piers Wenger joined from Channel 4 last year. The UK public broadcaster’s scripted offering will be marked by risk-taking and Britishness according to the drama chief.“In a world where there is just so much content, it’s never been more important for BBC Drama to deliver the unexpected and for us to be clear and strong on what sets us apart,” he said. “Only by thinking outside the usual parameters will we discover the next generation of standout shows.”Wenger went on to set out a five-year vision for BBC Drama. “I also want a strong streak of Britishness to run through the centre of everything we do. It gives us distinctiveness in a crowded landscape and a strong identity internationally.“I think that it’s the individuality, chutzpah, determined vision and tireless curiosity at the heart of Britain’s creative community which has played a huge part in turning drama from the UK into such a valuable cultural export and so I’d like the next five years of drama from the BBC to be a celebration of British authorship, identity and life in all its most diverse forms.”Jane Featherstone’s Sister Pictures, will make Duty/Shame. She set up the prodco last year after leaving Humans producer Kudos and Humans writer Joe Barton will pen the BBC-Netflix copro. The US-based streaming service is sinking a huge amount into original programming and is also starting to coproduce.The SVOD service has been both lauded and criticised for its algorithm-based approach to programming and Wenger told press he wanted the BBC to move away from that kind of commissioning and to take creative risks and trust its instincts.Almost half of the new series on Wenger’s slate are book adaptations. The adaptation of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds will be produced by Mammoth Screen, Rumer Godden’s Black Narcissus by DNA Films, Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women by Playground and John Preston’s A Very English Scandal: Sex, Lies And A Murder Plot At The Heart Of The Establishment by Blueprint Pictures. All will be three-parters and Little Women is another US-UK copro, this time with PBS Masterpiece.Also running to three instalments are Come Home, a family drama from StudioCanal’s Red Production Company, and The Wilsons, a period mystery series from Snowed-In ProductionsThe adaptation of Vikram Seth’s international bestseller A Suitable Boy, meanwhile, will be 8x1hrs. The BBC One slate is rounded off by Informa, a crime and terrorism drama from Call the Midwide prodco Neal Street Productions.For BBC Two there is Stephen Poliakoff’s semi-autobiographical Summer Of Rockets, a six-part series from Little Island Productions.Youth-skewed online net BBC Three has Overshadowed from Rollem Productions, an 8x10mins series about anorexia, adapted from the play of the same name.“Delivering high quality drama that engages and excites the public is a priority for the BBC,” said BBC director-general Tony Hall. “The commissions we have announced will continue to deliver just that. It’s an exciting time ahead for fans of great drama.”last_img read more

Read More →

Bike Channel UK has gone into administration and c

first_imgBike Channel UK has gone into administration and ceased broadcasting after reportedly failing to sell the business.The news, which was reported first by Cycling Weekly, follows the resignation of Bike Channel CEO and former Scripps Networks Interactive executive Filippo Ubaldini at the end of July.In a statement to Cycling Weekly, administrators FRP Advisory said: “Bike Media has created a loyal following across a range of specialist cycling communities, but despite the growth in viewers to Bike Channel across broadcast networks, the business had faced pressure on working capital.“Attempts to obtain new investment via a sale of the business did not materialise and, with unsustainable pressure on cash-flow, the directors were left with no viable option other than to seek the protection of administration.”Parent company Bike Media launched Bike Channel in the UK in 2015 and the channel was available on Freesat, Virgin and Sky. Bike first launched as a channel in Italy in 2012.last_img read more

Read More →

Media transport company Net Insight has named form

first_imgMedia transport company Net Insight has named former Ericsson executive Gunilla Fransson as its preferred successor for outgoing chairman of the board Lars Berg.Gunilla FranssonBerg, who has been chairman for the past 17 years and a Net Insight board member for 18 years, is due to step down at the company’s next annual general meeting on May 8, 2018.Net Insight said it will propose Fransson, who has been a Net Insight board member since 2008, to take over the post, which will be elected at the AGM.Fransson has more than 20 years’ experience in the telecom sector, formerly holding several senior positions in the Ericsson group. Up until 2016 she was also a member of Saab’s management.“Lars Berg’s contribution for Net Insight during his 18 years on the Board and almost as long as the chairman cannot be emphasised. His broad experience has been extremely valuable for Net Insight’s development into the company we see today,” said the chairman of Net Insight’s nomination committee, Ramsay Brufer.“As a successor to him, the nomination committee propose Gunilla Fransson. She has a long and wide experience from technology companies where she has worked actively with issues related to strategy, growth and change. After nine years as a board member, Gunilla Fransson has also a good knowledge of Net Insight.”last_img read more

Read More →

Marvels Jessica Jones Netflix enjoyed a clean swe

first_imgMarvel’s Jessica JonesNetflix enjoyed a clean sweep in Parrot Analytics’ latest assessment of in-demand digital originals in Germany, topped by Marvel’s Jessica Jones and Stranger Things.Parrot Analytics analyses the demand for recent popular digital titles across international markets, based on the application of artificial intelligence to expressions of demand across social media, fan sites, peer-to-peer protocols and file-sharing platforms.For the week ending March 25, Marvel’s Jessica Jones led the pack, garnering an average 4.92 million in-demand expression, ahead of Stranger Things with just over four million.The pair were well ahead of number three-placed Star Trek: Discovery, produced for CBS All Access in the US but distributed by Netflix internationally. Star Trek: Discovery garnered an average 2.96 million in-demand expressions for the March 19-25 period.Netflix’s Black Mirror and Altered Carbon rounded out the top five with 2.7 million and 2.57 million average in-demand expressions respectively.Other titles in the top 10 were Orange is the New Black, Daredevil, 13 Reasons Why, CBS All Access’s The Good Fight – again distributed by Netflix in Germany – and Santa Clarita Diet.last_img read more

Read More →

SPIFilmBoxs channels FilmBox Africa HD and Fashi

first_imgSPI/FilmBox’s channels FilmBox Africa HD and FashionBox HD are to launch on the StarSat DTH and OTT platforms in South Africa.The launch will give StarSat Africa subscribers with access to FilmBox Africa the chance to view content including action crime series No Easy Days from Red Rock Entertainment, which will premiere on the channel On June 5.In addition to the two channels taken by StarSat, SPI/Filmbox also distributes six other channels across the region: FightBox HD, DocuBox HD, Fast&FunBox HD, FilmBox Art House, 360TuneBox and Gametoon.Debbie Wu, CEO of StarSat owner On Digital Media said: “StarSat has gone to great lengths to enhance the quality and depth of its pay TV entertainment offer in South Africa by providing new and exciting viewing experiences to our loyal customers. We are delighted to extend the multi-channel viewing experience by adding these two new channels. We recognize the demand in South Africa for truly dynamic content that is both culturally relevant and entertaining – which is what StarSat is all about. Our loyal customers should expect much more immersive storytelling experiences on our platform in the near future.”Amit Karni, head of distribution for SPI in Africa, said: “We are honoured to cooperate with StarSat to launch FilmBox Africa HD and FashionBox HD on its DTH and OTT platforms in South Africa and neighbouring countries, bringing fresh, new and exciting content to its audiences.”last_img read more

Read More →

Unitymedia CEO Lutz Schüler is swapping one Libert

first_imgUnitymedia CEO Lutz Schüler is swapping one Liberty Global division for another after being appointed chief operating officer of Virgin Media.Lutz SchülerSchüler, who has been chief executive of Germany’s Unitymedia since January 2011, is due to take up his new post in the UK on September 10 and will report directly to Virgin Media CEO Tom Mockridge.He and takes over from Jeff Dodds and Neil Bartholomew, who have been filling in on an interim basis since former Virgin Media COO Dana Strong moved to Comcast earlier this year to become the US operator’s president of consumer services.Dodds and Bartholomew will retain key leadership roles at Virgin following Schüler’s arrival, heading up mobile and customer operations, respectively. At Unitymedia, Schüler will be replaced by chief financial officer Winfried Rapp.“For the past eight years Lutz has done an outstanding job running our operations in Germany and creating significant value for Liberty Global,” said Liberty Global president and CEO, Mike Fries.“Since our initial acquisitions in 2009 and 2010, Unitymedia has grown revenue 60% and operating cash flow 80% and has led the market in broadband innovation. With the pending sale of our German business to Vodafone, Virgin Media takes on greater importance within our platform in Europe and we want the strongest team possible driving this business. I couldn’t be happier to keep Lutz in the Liberty family.”Tom Mockridge said that Schüler’s track record in Germany speaks for itself and that he will “provide a new level of marketing energy and leadership that will benefit Virgin Media customers and employees.”Schüler said: “As I embrace this new challenge, I know that Unitymedia will be in strong, capable hands under Winni’s leadership. He is committed to our customers, to our employees and to the communities we serve.”last_img read more

Read More →

Parrot Analytics analysis of 2018s Emmy nominatio

first_imgParrot Analytics analysis of 2018’s Emmy nominations reveals that this year’s awards are potentially over-valuing HBO and Netflix shows.According to the report, HBO’s success in the Emmys outpaces Netflix when you correlate popular demand for their titles (measured by Parrot Analytics’ ‘demand expressions’) and the amount of awards they have been nominated for.Parrot Analytics assesses ‘demand’ for popular shows through various ‘demand expression platforms’ including social media and photo-sharing platforms such as Facebook and Instagram. In this case they assessed demand for the US only.As can be seen below, with 4.3% share of the US demand of the 11 networks (that received 15 nominations or over) and 4.2% of the Emmy nominations, Showtime’s titles more or less matched audience popularity with the amount of nominations they received.Both HBO and Netflix over-performed when the popularity of their shows was compared to Emmy nominations, but HBO did so by 11.5% where Netflix did by 7.3%.None of the other over-performing networks come close to these numbers, although FX, Hulu, Amazon and Nat Geo also gained a surplus of Emmy nominations compared to the popularity of their shows.NBC has 1.6% fewer awards than would be expected by popularity, CBS has 9.1% fewer, ABC 9.4% and Fox 11.6%.“Our analysis demonstrates that there is a large data spread that exists when network/platform popularity is correlated with the number of nominations received,” said the analysis company. “Netflix should have received even more nominations given the popularity of their original shows.”last_img read more

Read More →